Safety Quiz!

 In 2023, Tip of the Week

So far this month, we’ve mentioned stroke awareness and mental health, as they relate to the month of May. As we draw to the close of May, we recognize that it is time to think about heat, and the prevention of heat related illnesses. This becomes even more important as temperatures in the southern part of the U.S. continue to soar. We’ll focus our safety quiz on the topic of heat illness prevention. You know that you are supposed to drink water to prevent heat related illnesses. What else do you remember? Test yourself! Answers are at the end of the tip.

1. An important component of heat illness prevention is acclimatization – getting used to being out in the heat gradually. What is the recommended length of time that it generally takes the average person to get used to working in the heat?

 

A. About 1 to 2 hours.

B. About 1 to 2 days.

C. About 3 to 4 days.

D. About 7 to 10 days.

2. Your coworker takes antihypertensive (high blood pressure) medication. Could that medication make him less tolerant of the heat, putting him at a higher risk of a heat related illness?

 

A. No, most medications do not affect people’s tolerance to the heat.

B. Yes, some medications, including some antihypertensive medications, could affect your coworker’s tolerance to heat.

C. No, while some medications affect people’s heat tolerance, antihypertensives are not on that list.

D. No, the coworker says he is fine, so there’s no potential risk.

3. Some medications can be risk factors that increases your susceptibility for a heat-related illnesses. What are some other risk factors?

 

A. Some diseases, like heart disease or diabetes.

B. Certain health conditions, such as obesity, or lack of physical activity.

C. Use of opioids, methamphetamine, or cocaine.

D. Alcohol abuse.

E. None of the above.

F. All of the above are risk factors.

4. After working outside for about an hour, your coworker is sweating a lot, her skin is pale, and she is weaving as she walks. You ask if she’s okay, but she’s having trouble answering. What heat-related illness could she be experiencing?

 

A. Heat rash.

B. Heat stress.

C. Heat exhaustion.

D. Heat stroke.

5. What could you do to provide medical help to your coworker in question 4?

 

A. Get her into the shade and pour cool water over her.

B. Get her into the shade, give her cool water to drink, have her rest for a while and observer her to see if her symptoms get better. If the symptoms persist, take her to a doctor.

C. Give her some water and send her back to work.

D. Her symptoms are not serious, you don’t need to do anything.

Weekly Safety Challenge:

It is well known that heat stroke is the most serious heat-related illness, and it can sometimes be fatal. What are the symptoms of heat stroke? What can you do if you or a coworker have heat stroke?

 

1. D. It takes about 7 – 10 days to get used to working in the heat according to the National Institutes of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

2. B. Some medications, including some antihypertensive medications, could affect people’s tolerance to heat.

3. F. Some diseases, your overall health, abuse of some illicit drugs and alcohol can be risk factors for heat related illnesses.

4. C. She may be experiencing heat exhaustion.

5. B. You should get her into the shade, give her cool water to drink, have her rest for a while and observer her to see if her symptoms get better. If the symptoms persist, take her to a doctor.

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